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Delicious Dvorák

FRI, MAY 8 / 20:00
THEATER AAN HET VRIJTHOF

CLASSICAL MUSIC EXPERIENCE

Here’s your chance to check off your classical bucketlist.
Only €10, – per concert if you’re under 30.
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to visit a real classical concert? What it would feel like to lose yourself in the iconic melodies of world-famous composers? Consider yourself lucky because we’ve curated a special series of must hears, just for you. A classical music bucketlist for this year, and this year only. Next up: Antonín Dvořák, the first musician on the moon.

ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK

Antonín was born in 1841 in Prague, Czech. At the age of six he attended his first violin lessons. A few years later he also learned how to play the piano and organ. He played in his teacher’s orchestra and around the age of twelve, he started composing for the first time. He entered the city’s Organ School but after graduating, he was unable to find a job as a musician. He started playing viola in a small orchestra that performed on markets and in cafes. Dvořák couldn’t afford concert tickets but being part of the orchestra gave him the opportunity to attend concerts and operas for free. During his years with the orchestra, Dvořák learned to compose as an autodidact. It was only at a later age that people started to appreciate Dvořák’s talent. He started publishing his music, including fourteen pieces for string quartets. His most famous work is his Symphony No. 9 ‘From the New World’. Did you know that Neil Armstrong took a recording of this piece during his Apollo 11 mission in 1969? This basically makes Dvořák the first musician on the moon.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Of course, you will hear the Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 this evening. Dvořák composed this work in America at the end of the nineteenth century. For Europeans, America was called ‘The New World’ at that time. Dvořák was inspired by music from that new world, but he also used native American music in his composition. In his Symphony No. 9, you will also hear Dvořák’s nostalgic feelings for his home country. During the evening, you will also enjoy the beautiful guitar concert of Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez, played by soloist Juan Manuel Cañizares. Led by chief conductor Dmitri Liss, this celebration of Antonín Dvořák promises to be a real feast for the ears.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Of course, you will hear the Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 this evening. Dvořák composed this work in America at the end of the nineteenth century. For Europeans, America was called ‘The New World’ at that time. Dvořák was inspired by music from that new world, but he also used native American music in his composition. In his Symphony No. 9, you will also hear Dvořák’s nostalgic feelings for his home country. During the evening, you will also enjoy the beautiful guitar concert of Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez, played by soloist Juan Manuel Cañizares. Led by chief conductor Dmitri Liss, this celebration of Antonín Dvořák promises to be a real feast for the ears.

Q & A

What to wear to a classical music concert?
A classic night out calls for a classic outfit! Wear whatever you like but it’s a perfect opportunity to dress up. Shine those shoes, iron that shirt, put that hair up. Time to get fancy!
Is talking allowed during a concert?
Try to keep your mouth shut during the music, if you have to talk, stick to compliments. You’ll appreciate it too.
Can I use my cell phone?

Slippery slopes. Use your phone with moderation. Take a selfie, share a post but keep it minimal. Enjoy the show! Except for the Wolfgang App, we love that! But seriously. At least turn the sound of www.wolfgangapp.nl (Dutch only).